William Scott

William Scott


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

William Scott played football for Forfar Athletic. In 1888 he moved to London to work at Royal Arsenal in Woolwich, one of the government's main munition factories.

Barbour made his debut for Woolwich Arsenal in the 1888-89 season. He joined a team that included J. M. Charteris, Peter Connolly, David Danskin, Richard Horsington, Fred Beardsley, Joseph Bates, Humphrey Babour and John McBean.

Woolwich Arsenal continued to make good progress and won the London Charity Cup in 1890. During his time at the club, Scott, an outside left, scored 28 goals in 42 games.


William Scott (Missouri judge)

William Scott (June 7, 1804 – 1862) was an American lawyer and judge who served on the Supreme Court of Missouri from 1841 to 1849 and from 1851 to 1862. [1] [2] He also served on the Jefferson City Circuit Court. [3] Justice Scott was the author of the majority opinion in Scott v. Emerson, 15 Missouri 572 (1852), which was part of the Dred Scott v. Sandford case. Scott's opinion, which overturned well-established precedent in Missouri, set the stage for Dred Scott's case in the Supreme Court. [4] [5] He wrote:

Times are not now as they were when the former decisions on this subject were made. Since then not only individuals but States have been possessed with a dark and fell spirit in relation to slavery, whose gratification is sought in the pursuit of measures, whose inevitable consequences must be the overthrow and destruction of our government. Under such circumstances it does not behoove the State of Missouri to show the least countenance to any measure which might gratify this spirit. She is willing to assume her full responsibility for the existence of slavery within her limits, nor does she seek to share or divide it with others. [6]

Born in Fauquier County, Virginia, Scott moved to Missouri in 1827 and became a Circuit Attorney, living in Union. He took Mathias McGirk's spot on the state supreme court in 1841 when McGirk resigned. He was confirmed to the position in 1843. In 1849 all positions on the court were vacated by a constitutional amendment. In 1851 Scott was returned to the court after another constitutional amendment made the justices' positions elective, succeeding James Harvey Birch, who declined to run he was re-elected in 1857. In late 1861 he was one of the justices who refused to take an oath of loyalty to the national government, and lost his position. After his death in 1862 he was buried on his farm near Jefferson City. [2] [7] [8] [9]


History

Dr. H. William Scott, Jr. came to Nashville in 1952 as Professor and Chairman of the Department of Surgery at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. At the time he was the youngest chairman of surgery in the country. By the time of his retirement his leadership had spanned 30 years, a feat few have matched.

Dr. Scott was born in Graham, North Carolina and attended Darlington School. In 1933 he matriculated to the University of North Carolina and obtained an AB degree and was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. He attended Harvard Medical School, graduating in 1941 with Alpha Omega Alpha distinction. His training included the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital and later, the Boston Children’s Hospital. After his residency at Boston Children’s Hospital he was appointed to the coveted Harvey Cushing Fellowship in Neurosurgery. In 1946 he joined the surgical house staff under the legendary Dr. Alfred Blalock at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. On completion of his surgical residency, Dr. Scott joined the faculty at Johns Hopkins Hospital and rose to the rank of Associate Professor in three years. Dr. Barney Brooks, Chair of the Vanderbilt Department of Surgery then, became aware of Dr. Scott’s rapid ascension in academics at Hopkins. Within five years of completing his surgical residency, Dr. Scott was chosen to succeed Dr. Brooks as Chairman of Surgery.

Under Dr. Scott’s leadership, the Vanderbilt Department of Surgery became renown throughout the world for its clinical excellence, education and research. He had a major impact on the development of graduate surgical education in this country and has made many significant contributions to surgical science in gastrointestinal surgery, pheochromocytoma and bariatric surgery. In recognition for his many outstanding contributions he was elected as President of many of the most distinguished societies in surgery, including the Society of University Surgeons, the Nashville Surgical Society, the Society of Clinical Surgeons, the Halsted Society, the Society for Surgery of the Alimentary Tract, the Southern Surgical Association, the American Surgical Association and the American College of Surgeons. Dr. Scott was also honored by Johns Hopkins University with election to the Society of Scholars.

The H. William Scott, Jr. Scott Society was formed in 1972 by his former residents to honor Dr. Scott as well as recognize those who have trained at Vanderbilt and embrace Dr. Scott’s tradition of excellence.


China : its history and culture

Access-restricted-item true Addeddate 2011-08-05 21:40:34 Boxid IA141801 Boxid_2 BWB220141105 Camera Canon EOS 5D Mark II City New York Donor friendsofthesanfranciscopubliclibrary Edition 3rd ed., 2nd McGraw-Hill pbk. ed. External-identifier urn:oclc:record:1148188789 Extramarc University of Toronto Foldoutcount 0 Identifier chinaitshistory000mort Identifier-ark ark:/13960/t9r220b20 Isbn 0070434247 Lccn 94037610 Ocr ABBYY FineReader 8.0 Openlibrary OL1111781M Openlibrary_edition OL9250588M Openlibrary_work OL280891W Page-progression lr Pages 358 Ppi 500 Related-external-id urn:isbn:1283315491
urn:oclc:816869233
urn:isbn:0690018630
urn:lccn:80007851
urn:oclc:247304649
urn:oclc:6330767
urn:isbn:0070434212
urn:lccn:81015591
urn:oclc:246644796
urn:oclc:495926420
urn:oclc:610302827
urn:oclc:7838081
urn:oclc:833289669
urn:isbn:007146526X
urn:lccn:2004012714
urn:oclc:61110040
urn:oclc:614769444
urn:oclc:756512109
urn:isbn:0071412794
urn:oclc:223969192
urn:oclc:478835160
urn:oclc:55518062
urn:oclc:61670568
urn:oclc:704524900
urn:oclc:861360928
urn:isbn:0585193517
urn:oclc:45730699 Republisher_operator [email protected] Scandate 20111222055806 Scanner scribe12.shenzhen.archive.org Scanningcenter shenzhen Worldcat (source edition) 31289379

William "The Sleeping Sentinel" Scott Letters

William Scott enlisted as a private in Company K, Third Vermont Regiment, at Montpelier, on July 10, 1861. On August 31, 1861, an officer of the guard, in making his regular tour of inspection, found William Scott asleep at his post. Subsequently, Scott was court-martialed, found guilty, and sentenced "to be shot to death" on Monday, the 9th of September 1861.

On the morning of September 9, the regiments of the Vermont Brigade were drawn up ostensibly to witness the execution of William Scott. The firing squad took its position, the prisoner was brought forth, the death sentence read, and then, a pardon was issued to the prisoner. Just eight months later, on April 16, 1862, William Scott was mortally wounded at Warwick Creek midway between Lee's Mill and Wynn's Mill, Virginia.

William Scott was born in Groton, Vermont, in 1839 or 1840. Today, there is a marker at the site of the Scott homestead, which is located on the road (now Route 302) between Barre and Wells River. Seventy-nine Groton men enlisted in the Union Army 29, including William Scott and two of his brothers, died in service. William Scott's story is a classic example of how history is often rewritten. His plight was a closely followed human interest drama, reported by numerous newspapers. The event created such high interest that the story of the "Sleeping Sentinel" was printed in raised letters for the blind, a copy of which is currently in the Society's collection. As details of the story were embellished, the truth became more difficult to determine. In later years, many challenged that idea that Lincoln had pardoned Scott. However, in 1997, the original court-martial and pardon documents were discovered and authenticated. William Scott had indeed been pardoned by President Lincoln at the request of the enlisted man's regiment.

These letters written by William Scott are in the collection of the Vermont Historical Society (MS 973.732 Sc86).


William Scott - History

Few of the pioneer families of the Allegheny Region have been as extensively researched as the family named Scott who came to Randolph County in the late 1700's. Still, regardless or the level of scrutiny to which the early history of this family has been subjected, few family histories have ever been as confused and distorted as this one. Being by adoption a direct line descendant of George Hill Sr. (1782 - 1867) of the site of South Elkins, and his wife Rebecca Scott, I have long been interested in the history of the Scott families of the region. What follows is a brief outline of my findings after several years of research into the history of the family. I will present the facts as I believe they exist based on original documentation, and where my version of the family history differs from "the versions published in the past, I refer the reader to my footnotes which he or she may be to decide for themselves if my conclusions are valid.

While the ancestry of the family back of Randolph County John remains unknown I am quite convinced that his earliest American ancestor will turn out to be one Alexander Scott (c1690 -1751), the settlement of whose estate is in the records of Augusta County. This Alexander Scott was quite probably one of the thousands of Presbyterians from Northern Ireland .i. e. "Scotch Irish") who immigrated to the American Colonies in the 1700s. This Alexander Scott appears to have left several children, and of these the ones of most interest to our study were John (not John of Randolph), David, and Benjamin. The records of this family even down to this early generation are voluminous, and beyond the scope of this writing. The one of chief interest to the Scotts of Randolph County was John.

This earlier John Scott also died about 1751, and he also left several children.(1) He appears so have been born sometime around the year 1715, and the evidence might suggest that his wife's name was Judith Davis.(2) Among this earlier John Scott's sons were Jacob, John, and James, and these sons went with their uncle, David Scott, to Scott's Run in what is now Monongalia County, West Virginia, by the early 1770s (3). Again the history of this generation and their exploits on the Monongahela River near Morgantown could fill several articles, but the footnotes provided should be enough to make their connection to the Hardy County Scott, mentioned above It now remains to establish a connection between this family and John Scott of Randolph County.

John Scott first appears in Randolph County in the tax list of 1796. It is suspected, although not proven, that he may have been the John Scott "Jr" in the 1782 Monongalia County tax list, but more research is needed to prove that connection. IT he were then he may have been "he son of the John Scott "Sr" of the same 1782 tax list. This John Scott "Sr" is thought to be the John Scott, son of John Scott who died in 1751, but again more research is needed to establish the link.

One might wonder why I would want to deal so extensively with this Scott family of Hardy and Monongalia Counties if they cannot be proven as the ancestors of John of Randolph County. The reason is that there is a good deal of evidence, although circumstantial, that this Monongalia County Scott family was the family from which John Scott of Randolph County came.

As was stated above, John Scott appears in the tax list of Randolph County of 1796. He did not live long, however, as his wife Mary was listed in the tax list alone in 1800. The estate of John Scott was sold in October of that year, and his widow married Abraham Kittle Sr in 1805. Earlier that year she had leased a farm in her own name near the present day Elkins Airport from William B. Wilson.(4) One of her nearest neighbor at that location was one John Sproul, and the association between the Scott family and Sproul is key to placing John Scott of Randolph County in the Monongalia County Scott family. John Sproul first shows up in the tax lists of Randolph County in 1792. It is not certain where he came from or if he was married at the time of his coming to Randolph. He is known to have been a very close associate of the family of John Scott, having an association so close that it is almost certain that he was a relative. His name appears as a witness and in some other capacities on several documents relating to the Scott family, and he left the "heirs of John Scott" $1.00 in his will. He married Hester Dawson in Harrison County in 1813, and she had some very definite connections with Monongalia County and the Scott family there.

The maiden name of this Hester Dawson was Hester Foggy. She was a sister of John Foggy, a merchant of Philadelphia, who had immigrated from Ireland (probably Northern Ireland) and who owned land in Monongalia County. (5) It is not known who the first husband of Hester Foggy Dawson was but the Dawson family were early settlers on Scott's Mill Run in Monongalia County, and were early neighbors of the Monongalia County Scots. The names of Thomas Charles, and William Dawson are frequent on the records there.(6) Hester Dawson was raising the orphan son of John Foggy, named William Foggy, and in 1813 he was apprenticed by the Harrison County Court to Forbes and Alexander Britton.(7) This gave Hester Sproul yet another connection to the Monongalia County Scotts, as Forbes Britton was married to Elizabeth Pindle, daughter of Thomas Pindle, and Thomas Pindle had married for a second wife Judith Scott, a probably granddaughter of the John Scott who died in 1751.(8)

So while the ancestry of John Scott remains unproven, we have enough information to make some hypothetical connections. He appears to have had only one relative in the area, John Sproul, and we can definitely connect Sproul's wife to the Scott family and Monongalia County. It is known that Mary, wife of John Scott, was born in Pennsylvania, and Pennsylvania borders Monongalia County. In fact, it would not be unreasonable to assume that she may have been born a Dawson, as she and John Scott named sons, Thomas Charles, and William and these are names know in the Dawson family of Monongalia County and Pennsylvania. Finally, at about the time John Scott shows up in Randolph County, John Chenoweth, the namesake of Chenoweth Creek, also shows up in the area. He settled on a farm very near the one rented from Wilson by Mary Scott, and Chenoweth's relatives are known to have been on Scott's Mill Run with the Scotts in Monongalia County in the 1770's.(9) So regardless of what unfounded genealogical connections have been advanced over the years for the origins of John Scott of Randolph County, The EVIDENCE clearly suggests that he cam out of the Scott family in Monongalia County, and that he was a descendant of the earlier Scott family in Hardy County. More research is needed to strengthen and prove this assumption.

As much as the ancestry of John Scott has been subject to some misunderstanding, so has the subject of the identity of his children. Some effort was made many years ago to disassociate part of the descendants of John and Mary Scott from the other members of the family, and some have mistakenly placed other Scotts in the family when they do not in fact belong. Hu Maxwell wrongly listed the name of Henry Scott for the bride's father in the marriage record of George Hill and Rebecca Scott, when no such name appears in the actual marriage record. It has also been traditionally thought that Thomas Scott of the area of Haddix Road was a nephew and not a son of John Scott, and this also has been discounted. So it is left to deal with the authentic record of who the children of John Scott were, based on their own paper trail.

As I have stated, John Scott died between 1796 and 1800, and his widow Mary married Abraham Kittle 8r. in 1005. At the time of that marriage Kittle was about 75 years old and Mary was about 39. It is known that he lived on his land grant at what today is known as Sullivan's Crossing near Elkins, as his family members have marked graves in the graveyard there, one dating back to 1801!. So Abraham and Mary (Scott) Kittle were living there during the War of 1812, and he died in 1816. That would have left Mary on the Kittle farm as the senior member of the family. So who was there with her? That question can be answered for certain by one document at the Randolph County courthouse: Chancery File 2 Case 23. In the papers of that court case, in which George H. Scott is asking the court for a deed to the Kittle farm, he states that his father William Scott had lived on the Kittle place for 30 years at the time of his (William's) death in 1844. So that document conclusively places William Scott on the Kittle farm in 1814, eight years before he married!

William Scott's brother Charles was older, and it appears that he became the head of household. The 1820 census show him with a female born before 1775, and I believe this to be Mary Scott Kittle. Proof that Charles Scott lived on the Kittle farm can be found in Randolph County Deed Book 10 at page 345 when in 1830 he lost his title to he farm due to debts. His life seems to have been falling apart about that time. His wife Agnes died about then, and given Charles' financial problems it appears that William Scott mentioned above, who had married Ann Clark from the farm next door, took over as head of household on the Kittle farm.

William Scott died in 1844, and so did Rebecca (Scott) Hill, wife of George Hill. She and Hill lived on a neighboring farm at what is now Riverview Addition to the City of Elkins. These farms and the Clark farm are all in sight of each other. So William's death left his wife Ann living on the Kittle place with several minor children. She then remarried to George Hill, and moved over to his farm, leaving Mary Scott Kittle probably still on the Kittle farm alone. At the time Charles Scott appears to have been living in a common law marriage with Jane Kittle, his deceased wife's sister, and Mary Scott Kittle appears to have moved out to the Haddix Road farm of her other son, Thomas Scott.

In 1905 Solomon Scott died. He was a son of William and Ann (Clark) Scott, and he lived on his grandfather John Clark's farm, directly across the river from Elkins' present day Riverview Addition. In Solomon Scott' obituary in the Randolph Enterprise(10) it clearly states that his father William, and Charles, and Thomas Scott were brothers, and this evidence when considered with the circumstantial evidence in the preceding three paragraphs clearly proves who three of the children of John Scott were. Further circumstantial evidence will show that there were others.

Rebecca Scott married George Hill in 1812. Charles Scott (above) married Agnes Kittle in 1813, and Elizabeth Scott married Alexander McQuain in 1815. All three of these weddings were performed by the Reverend John Rowan. He lived on what is now Georgetown Road across the river from the Abraham Kittle farm, so this implies that these persons were in the vicinity of the Kittle place at the time of their marriages. Elizabeth McQuain named a son George Hill McQuain, and William Scott (above) named a on George H. Scott! So two of the Scotts named sons after George Hill, husband of Rebecca Scott! This evidence will place Elizabeth Scott McQuain as a sibling of Rebecca Scott Hill and William Scott, and since we know "from the Solomon Scott obituary that William was a brother of Thomas and Charles, we have three girls placed as probable sister's in this family.

In 1984, when Bill Rice wrote his book, "THE ANCESTRY AND DESCENDANTS OF BENJAMIN THIXTON SCOTT, he became so far as I know the first historian to deal in any detail with the family of John and Mary Scott. Mr. Rice stated that based on circumstantial evidence the above persons were children of John and Mary Scott, but he did not present such evidence in any detail. I in turn set out to test his theory, to see if I would arrive at the same conclusion, independently. Based on the above and other evidence I have decided that the chapter in Bill Rice's book dealing with John Scott is accurate in it's dealing with who the children of Scott were. In addition to the children presented above, Bill Rice and I have decided independent of each other that Prudence Scott, who married Henry Hardman, and John Scott, who begins to show up in the records of Randolph County about 1813 are also children of John and Mary Scott. I cannot present such solid evidence to plead the case for Prudence Hardman, but this younger John Scott was a constant associate of the Kittle family, witnessing their wills and buying at their estates, etc. Where he went I do not know.

In addition to dealing in some detail with the "family of John Scott, Bill Rice's Scott history also discounts the assumption, first advanced by Hu MAXWELL, that Benjamin Thixton Scott, a resident of Randolph County contemporary with John Scott, was a son of John Scott. Rice presented credible evidence that Benjamin Thixton Scott was actually born Benjamin THIXTON, and that Benjamin Thixton did not even begin to go by the name of Scott until adulthood, when he married. Since the publication of Mr. Rice' book new evidence has come to light that proves conclusively that his conclusions about Benjamin Thixton Scott were correct. An affidavit book in the Randolph county courthouse shows two affidavits dated May and June 1847 in which John Light and Levi Coberly appeared in court and testified that Benjamin Thickson Scott was:

The Rice publication together with the above documentation prove that Benjamin Thixton Scott was born Benjamin Thixton and took the name of Scott later in life, and was NOT a son of John and Mary Scott as his sketch in Maxwell's History of Randolph County says.

So in conclusion, John Scott of Randolph county appears to have been from the Scott family who were in the Hardy County area in the 1750s, although his connection to that family is based on some circumstantial evidence. He seems to have came to Randolph from the Monongalia County vicinity about 1796, died by 1800, and left a widow named Mary who married Abraham Kittle Sr. Solid evidence will show that he left four sons: Thomas, Charles, John, and William. Further circumstantial evidence will show that in addition to theme sons John Scott left three daughters, namely Prudence, wife of Henry Hardman Rebecca, wife of George Hill Sr. and Elizabeth, wife of Alexander McQuain. I hope that the above will serve to discount a persistent family tradition that the John Scott family come from an Alexander Scott family in Pennsylvania.(11)

Perhaps the above will provide a basis for further study by more thorough and competent researchers. Much work is needed to document or disprove both John Scott's connection to the Hardy County Scotts and his removal to Randolph from (or through) the Monongalia County area. Perhaps the maiden name of his wife Mary can someday be learned, and perhaps we will someday know the connection between John Sproul and John Scott. These persons were antebellum residents at the site of Elkins, West Virginia, and hopefully their contribution to the development of the area can be remembered by interested persons in the future.

(1). For a better look at these children see Augusta Co Will Book 1 page 405, and Book 3 page 310, 369 Augusta Co Order Book 8 page 389 These records also establish a connection to Jonathan Arnold, a fellow Pennsylvanian who was a neighbor and associate of George Hill and the Scotts in the area of Elkins, West Virginia.

(2). ACWB 3 page 310, 369 ibid ACWB 8 page 161 the later of which connects the Davis family with the Sproul family see section of article dealing with John Sproul

(3). Zinn, Melba P. MONONGALIA COUNTY RECORDS OF DISTRICT AND SUPERIOR COURT, Bowie, Md, Heritage Books, 1990, page 29: Jacob and James Scott "of Augusta County but residents of Monongalia" 1774 Hardy County Deed Book 2 page, 181 179l David Scott of Monongalia County, heir of James Scott, who was heir of John Scott in land Lunice Creek, Hardy County

(4). Randolph County Deed Book (Wilson to Scott lease)

(5). Monongalia County Deed Book 0S9 page 179 William Worth to John Foggy of the City of Philadelphia, trader, 1000 acres land Hunsacres Glade 1828, 1856 Monongalia County Land Books William Foggy of Randolph County 1000 acres Monongalia County Deed Book 6 page 312 This property was on the line of present day Monongalia and Preston Counties John Foggy's immigration documented in 1870 Randolph County census, William Foggy's listing shows both parents as foreign born, and also in Philby's PHILADELPHIA NATURALIZATION RECORDS which shows a John Foggy naturalization record in 1799 a 1992 letter from Donalyn S Dowman of Bay Village, Ohio, to this writer quotes an old piece of paper in the hands of Foggy descendant Ilene White which paper quoted an administration paper in the name of Hester Dawson on the estate of John Foggy.

(6). Monongalia County Deed Book 1 page 125 William Dawson of Washington County, PA appoints Charles Dawson attorney Monongalia County survey Book 1 page 192, 194, 216, 395 William and Thomas Dawson 1770's surveys on Scotts Mill Run

(7). Harrison County Minute Book 1813

(8). Coontz, Violet G., THE WESTERN WATERS, Denver, Stephen P. Coontz, 1991 pg 206, 207, 392, 393 Zinn, ibid., pg 29, 97

(9). Record of Commissioners of Unpatented Lands 23 April 1781 Thomas Chinnoth certified for 400 acres Scott Mill Run including his settlement in 1774 Randolph County Deed Book 2 page 131 April 1800 William Wilson to John Chenoweth. Not only does Chenoweth arrive about the same time as John Scott, but he had land dealings with the same family!

(10). RANDOLPH ENTERPRISE June 1905

(11). A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE SCOTT FAMILY by James Richard Scott, unpublished manuscript. While this manuscript is unpublished, so many copies have been circulated that we will probably never be rid of it. It claims to trace the Scott family from Samuel Scott from Scotland to a Thomas and Eunice Scott of 1790s Washington County, Pennsylvania, and finally to an Alexander Scott who married a Rebecca Crawford in Lancaster County. These family connections are pure fiction. It would seem that James Riddle Scott was a victim, for it apparently was the late Mary Genevieve Ward, herself a Scott descendant and researcher, who first advanced these connections based on "research in Pennsylvania". It also was apparently Ms. Ward who worked pretty hard to disassociate Thomas Scott's descendants from those of his brothers William and Charles. Ms. Ward claimed that Thomas was a COUSIN of William and Thomas, but the Solomon Scott obituary mentioned above proves the error of that Statement. Further, research trips into Washington, Greene, and Fayette Counties in Pennsylvania have satisfied me that the Alexander Scott and Thomas Scott of the Scott manuscript never existed there. While the names of Thomas and Alexander Scott do appear there, the details bear NO resemblance to the persons described in the Scott manuscript. Interested persons would do well to remember that the ancestry of the Scott family back of John remain unknown.


Scott History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

In the annals of Scottish history, few names go farther back than Scott, whose ancestors go back to the people of the Boernician tribe. The first family to use the name Scott lived in Roxburgh (now part of the region of Borders), Scotland. The surname Scott is of local origin as it denotes one who came from Scotland as in the Scot. The double 't' in Scott is now universal. Other records claim the name was for someone in England, who came to be from Scotland. Pre-dating surnames, the name may have been used for a Gaelic speaker within Scotland, who arrived with the Gaelic Dalriadans from Ireland in around 500 AD.

Set of 4 Coffee Mugs and Keychains

$69.95 $48.95

Early Origins of the Scott family

The surname Scott was first found in Roxburghshire, where a family seat was held on the lands of Ballendan at the head of the Ale water in that county. They descended from Uchtredus Scott who held the lands before 1107 he is on record as a witness to the foundation charter of Selkirk in 1120. Another early record is of Henricus le Scotte, who witnessed a charter by David Earl of Strathearn around 1195. By 1200, this great Clan controlled the borderlands of the Middle Marches of West Teviotdale, Ewesdale, Liddesdale, Buccleuch and Balweariel. [1]

Coat of Arms and Surname History Package

$24.95 $21.20

Early History of the Scott family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Scott research. Another 212 words (15 lines of text) covering the years 1296, 1450, 1565, 1611, 1745, 1565, 1611, 1647, 1661, 1644, 1693, 1649, 1685, 1674, 1705, 1771, 1832 and are included under the topic Early Scott History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Unisex Coat of Arms Hooded Sweatshirt

Scott Spelling Variations

Over the years, Scott has been written It appears under these variations because medieval scribes spelled names according to sound rather than by any over-arching set of rules. Scott, Scot, Skotts, Scot, Scotach, Scott, Schotts and many more.

Early Notables of the Scott family (pre 1700)

Notable amongst the family name during their early history was Walter Scott of Buccleuch (1565-1611), a Scottish nobleman and famous border reiver, known as the "Bold Buccleuch" Mary Scott, 3rd Countess of Buccleuch and Countess of Tarras (1647-1661) Scottish peeress who married at the age of 11 Walter Scott, 1st Earl of Tarras (1644-1693), a Scottish nobleman who.
Another 58 words (4 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Scott Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Scott family to Ireland

Some of the Scott family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 55 words (4 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Scott migration +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Scott Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Apphia Scott, who arrived in Virginia in 1618 [2]
  • Goodwife Scott, who arrived in Virginia in 1623
  • Dan Scott, who landed in Virginia in 1633 [2]
  • Elizabeth Scott, aged 9, who arrived in New England in 1634 [2]
  • Abigail Scott, aged 7, who arrived in New England in 1634 [2]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Scott Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Edward Scott, who arrived in Virginia in 1702 [2]
  • Anne Scott, who arrived in Virginia in 1703 [2]
  • Richard Scott, who landed in Virginia in 1705 [2]
  • Edward Scott, who landed in Annapolis, Maryland in 1716 [2]
  • Janet Scott, who landed in New England in 1724 [2]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Scott Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Hector Scott, aged 34, who landed in New York in 1800 [2]
  • Joicy Scott, who arrived in Charleston, South Carolina in 1800 [2]
  • Hugh Scott, who landed in America in 1801 [2]
  • Benjamin Scott, who arrived in America in 1803 [2]
  • Archd Scott, aged 26, who landed in New Castle or Philadelphia in 1804 [2]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Scott Settlers in United States in the 20th Century
  • Harry Scott, who arrived in Arkansas in 1900 [2]
  • Jewett McLellan Scott, aged 35, who landed in Mobile, Ala in 1905 [2]
  • Doddridge Malven Scott, who landed in Alabama in 1915 [2]
  • Lemuel Alton Scott, who landed in Alabama in 1917 [2]
  • Varian Cuthbert Scott, who landed in Alabama in 1918 [2]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Scott migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Scott Settlers in Canada in the 17th Century
Scott Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
  • James Scott, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1749
  • Joseph Scott, who landed in Halifax, Nova Scotia in 1749-1752
  • Joseph Scott, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1749
  • Richard Scott, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1749
  • Rosana Scott, who landed in Halifax, Nova Scotia in 1749-1752
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Scott Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
  • Thomas Scott, aged 37, a labourer, who arrived in Quebec aboard the ship "Atlas" in 1815
  • Janet Scott, aged 26, who arrived in Quebec aboard the ship "Atlas" in 1815
  • Agnes Scott, aged 5, who arrived in Quebec aboard the ship "Atlas" in 1815
  • Jane Scott, aged 2, who arrived in Quebec aboard the ship "Atlas" in 1815
  • Mary Anne Scott, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1820
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Scott Settlers in Canada in the 20th Century

Scott migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Scott Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Miss Sarah Scott, (b. 1783), aged 30, Irish convict who was convicted in Monaghan, Ireland for 7 years, transported aboard the "Catherine" on 8th December 1813, arriving in New South Wales, Australia[4]
  • Mr. Archibald Scott, Scottish convict who was convicted in Edinburgh, Scotland for 14 years, transported aboard the "Asiatic" on 5th June 1819, arriving in New South Wales, Australia[5]
  • Mr. Edward Scott, English convict who was convicted in Surrey, England for 7 years, transported aboard the "Asiatic" on 5th June 1819, arriving in New South Wales, Australia[5]
  • Mr. Thomas Scott, English convict who was convicted in Lancaster, Lancastershire, England for 7 years, transported aboard the "Asiatic" on 5th June 1819, arriving in New South Wales, Australia[5]
  • William Scott, English convict from Middlesex, who was transported aboard the "Agamemnon" on April 22, 1820, settling in New South Wales, Australia[6]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Scott migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Scott Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Janet Scott, who landed in Auckland, New Zealand in 1839
  • William Scott, who landed in New Zealand in 1839
  • Peter Scott, who landed in Wellington, New Zealand in 1840
  • A Scott, who landed in Wellington, New Zealand in 1840 aboard the ship Bengal Merchant
  • D Scott, who landed in Wellington, New Zealand in 1840
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name Scott (post 1700) +

  • Mr. William Edward Scott M.V.O., Scottish Head of Fire and Security for the Palace of Holyroodhouse, was appointed Member of the Royal Victorian Order on 29th December 2018 [7]
  • Tom Scott (1918-1995), Scottish poet, editor, and prose writer
  • Mr. John Scott, British sheriff, held the joint position of Sheriff of Nottingham, England from 1597 to 1598
  • Mr. William Scott, British sheriff, held the joint position of Sheriff of Nottingham, England from 1566 to 1567
  • Stephen Scott (1944-2021), American composer best known for his development of the bowed piano
  • Geoffrey Chase Scott (1942-2021), American actor and stuntman best known for appearing on the television series Dynasty for two seasons (1982 to 1984) as Mark Jennings
  • Willie Louis Scott (1959-2021), former American football tight end in the National Football League
  • Douglas Keith Scott CBE (1941-2020), English mountaineer, member of the team that made the first ascent of the south-west face of Mount Everest on 24 September 1975
  • Jacob E. Scott III (1945-2020), American professional football player who was a free safety and punt returner from 1970 to 1978 for the Miami Dolphins and Washington Redskins
  • William Sievwright "Bill" Scott CVO (b. 1946), Anglican priest, Deputy Clerk of the Closet 2007 to 2015
  • . (Another 57 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Historic Events for the Scott family +

Air New Zealand Flight 901
  • Mr. Russell Morrison Scott (d. 1979), New Zealander Purser, from Auckland, New Zealand working aboard the Air New Zealand sightseeing Flight 901 when it flew into Mount Erebus he died in the crash [8]
  • Mrs. Marie Theresa Scott (1939-1979), New Zealander passenger, from Dunedin, South Island, New Zealand aboard the Air New Zealand Flight 901 for an Antarctic sightseeing flight when it flew into Mount Erebus she died in the crash [8]
Arrow Air Flight 1285
  • Mr. Gary L Scott (b. 1964), American Specialist 4th Class from Oak Grove, Kentucky, USA who died in the crash [9]
Empress of Ireland
  • Mr. Walter Scott, British Engineer ex Empress of Asia from United Kingdom who worked aboard the Empress of Ireland and died in the sinking [10]
  • Mr. John Scott, Canadian Second Class Passenger from Mortlach, Saskatchewan, Canada who was traveling aboard the Empress of Ireland and died in the sinking [10]
  • Master Thomas A Scott (1912-1914), Canadian Third Class Passenger from Edmonton, Alberta, Canada who was traveling aboard the Empress of Ireland and died in the sinking [10]
  • Mrs. Margaret Scott (1889-1914), née Paverley Canadian Third Class Passenger from Edmonton, Alberta, Canada who was traveling aboard the Empress of Ireland and died in the sinking [10]
  • Mr. Thomas Usher Scott (1887-1914), Canadian Third Class Passenger from Edmonton, Alberta, Canada who was traveling aboard the Empress of Ireland and died in the sinking [10]
Flight TWA 800
  • Mr. Michael Gray Scott (1952-1996), from Stevenson, Alabama, USA, American passenger traveling with family flying aboard flight TWA 800 from J.F.K. Airport, New York to Leonardo da Vinci Airport, Rome when the plane crashed after takeoff he died in the crash [11]
  • Mr. Joseph Michael Scott (1983-1996), from Stevenson, Alabama, USA, American Physicist flying aboard flight TWA 800 from J.F.K. Airport, New York to Leonardo da Vinci Airport, Rome when the plane crashed after takeoff he died in the crash [11]
  • Mrs. Barbara Stewart Scott (1957-1996), from Stevenson, Alabama, USA, American registered nurse flying aboard flight TWA 800 from J.F.K. Airport, New York to Leonardo da Vinci Airport, Rome when the plane crashed after takeoff she died in the crash [11]
HMAS Sydney II
  • Mr. George Gillick Scott (1914-1941), Australian Acting Petty Officer from Kirribilli, New South Wales, Australia, who sailed into battle aboard HMAS Sydney II and died in the sinking [12]
HMS Dorsetshire
  • William John Scott (d. 1945), British Able Seaman aboard the HMS Dorsetshire when she was struck by air bombers and sunk he died in the sinking [13]
  • Eric Stuart Scott (d. 1945), British Chief Engine Room Artificer aboard the HMS Dorsetshire when she was struck by air bombers and sunk he died in the sinking [13]
HMS Hood
  • Mr. William P Scott (b. 1922), English Stoker 2nd Class serving for the Royal Navy from Darlington, County Durham, England, who sailed into battle and died in the sinking [14]
  • Mr. Robert C Scott (b. 1915), English Marine serving for the Royal Marine from Swindon, Wiltshire, England, who sailed into battle and died in the sinking [14]
  • Mr. James Scott (b. 1897), English Leading Stoker serving for the Royal Navy from Morpeth, Northumberland, England, who sailed into battle and died in the sinking [14]
  • Mr. Jack Scott (b. 1923), English Ordinary Seaman serving for the Royal Navy from Bradford, Yorkshire, England, who sailed into battle and died in the sinking [14]
  • Mr. Andrew B Scott (b. 1915), Scottish Seaman serving for the Royal Navy from Fraserburgh, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, who sailed into battle and died in the sinking [14]
HMS Prince of Wales
  • Mr. George Stanley Scott, British Marine, who sailed into battle on the HMS Prince of Wales and died in the sinking [15]
  • Mr. Scott, British Able Seaman, who sailed into battle on the HMS Prince of Wales and survived the sinking [15]
  • Mr. Scott, British Engine Room Artificer, who sailed into battle on the HMS Prince of Wales and died in the sinking [15]
HMS Repulse
  • Mr. John Scott (1921-1942), Scottish Able Bodied Seaman from Edinburgh, Scotland, who sailed into battle on the HMS Repulse and survived the sinking, was listed as missing presumed killed in the evacuation of Singapore in 1942 [16]
  • Mr. Frederic Jeane Scott (1919-1944), English Stoker 1st Class from Horwich, Lancashire, England, who sailed into battle on the HMS Repulse and survived the sinking, died whilst a Prisoner of War in in 1944 [16]
HMS Royal Oak
  • Edger L. Scott, British Painter with the Royal Navy aboard the HMS Royal Oak when she was torpedoed by U-47 and sunk he survived the sinking [17]
  • William Scott (1910-1939), British Leading Stoker with the Royal Navy aboard the HMS Royal Oak when she was torpedoed by U-47 and sunk he died in the sinking [17]
Lady of the Lake
  • Miss Margaret Scott (b. 1830), Irish traveller from Castletown, Ireland who sailed aboard the "Lady of the Lake" from Greenock, Scotland on 8th April 1833 to Quebec, Canada when the ship hit ice and sunk of the coast of Newfoundland on the 11th May 1833 and she died in the sinking
  • Mr. John Scott (b. 1827), Irish labourer from Castletown, Ireland who sailed aboard the "Lady of the Lake" from Greenock, Scotland on 8th April 1833 to Quebec, Canada when the ship hit ice and sunk of the coast of Newfoundland on the 11th May 1833 and he died in the sinking
  • Mrs. Nancy Scott (b. 1805), Irish traveller from Castletown, Ireland who sailed aboard the "Lady of the Lake" from Greenock, Scotland on 8th April 1833 to Quebec, Canada when the ship hit ice and sunk of the coast of Newfoundland on the 11th May 1833 and she died in the sinking
Pan Am Flight 103 (Lockerbie)
  • Sally Elizabeth Scott (1966-1988), American Chef from Huntington, New York, America, who flew aboard the Pan Am Flight 103 from Frankfurt to Detroit, known as the Lockerbie bombing in 1988 and died [18]
RMS Lusitania
  • Mr. C. Scott, English Fireman from England, who worked aboard the RMS Lusitania and died in the sinking [19]
  • Master Arthur Scott Jr., English 3rd Class passenger residing in No. Adams, USA, who sailed aboard the RMS Lusitania and survived the sinking [20]
  • Mrs. Alice Ann Scott, English 3rd Class passenger residing in No. Adams, USA, who sailed aboard the RMS Lusitania and died in the sinking and was recovered [20]
  • Captain Alick John Scott, English 1st Class Passenger residing in Manila, Philippines returning to England to enlist, who sailed aboard the RMS Lusitania and died in the sinking [20]
  • Mr. George Scott, Canadian 2nd Class passenger from Toronto, Ontario, Canada, who sailed aboard the RMS Lusitania and survived the sinking [20]
RMS Titanic
  • Mr. John Scott (d. 1912), aged 21, English Boots Steward from Southampton, Hampshire who worked aboard the RMS Titanic and died in the sinking [21]
  • Mr. Archibald Scott (d. 1912), aged 40, English Fireman/Stoker from Southampton, Hampshire who worked aboard the RMS Titanic, died in the sinking and was recovered by CS Mackay-Bennett [21]
  • Mr. Frederick William Scott (d. 1912), aged 28, English Trimmer from Southampton, Hampshire who worked aboard the RMS Titanic and died in the sinking [21]
USS Arizona
  • Mr. A. J. Scott, American Seaman Second Class working aboard the ship "USS Arizona" when she sunk during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7th December 1941, he died in the sinking [22]
  • Mr. Crawford Edward Scott, American Private First Class working aboard the ship "USS Arizona" when she sunk during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7th December 1941, he died in the sinking [22]
  • Mr. George Harrison Scott, American Private First Class working aboard the ship "USS Arizona" when she sunk during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7th December 1941, he died in the sinking [22]

Related Stories +

The Scott Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Amo
Motto Translation: I love


Literacy Efforts

Gray's assessment experience made him aware of student reading difficulties and the necessity to fit instruction to the perceived weaknesses of students. In 1922 this led to an influential book titled Remedial Cases in Reading: Their Diagnosis and Correction. This book marked the beginning of a diagnostic/prescriptive approach to individual differences that remained in practice at the beginning of the twenty-first century.

Gray had a continuing interest in adult literacy, publishing The Reading Interests and Habits of Adults in 1929 and Maturity in Reading: Its Nature and Appraisal in 1956. He was also involved with literacy on an international level, working particularly with the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). This led to The Teaching of Reading and Writing: An International Survey, first published in 1956. He was also a founder of the International Reading Association, serving as its first president in 1955&ndash1956.

Biographical information and a complete list of Gray's publications are included in a 1985 publication of the International Reading Association: William S. Gray: Teacher, Scholar, Leader, edited by Jennifer A. Stevenson. This document is also available as ERIC No. ED 255902.


Board Moves Ahead on Recommendations for Scott Cemetery and Preserving History in the Thoroughfare and The Settlement Communities

In recent weeks, the Prince William Board of County Supervisors directed staff to prepare a plan to research and interpret the cultural resources of the historically African American Thoroughfare and The Settlement communities and facilitate restoration of the Scott family cemetery, located in the Thoroughfare community. Additionally, the Board asked for recommendations on how to better research and preserve African American history, culture and historic communities throughout Prince William County.

During their meeting on May 18, the Board committed to allocate $765,000 for Fiscal Year 2022 for historic preservation, historical research and public interpretation in the communities of Thoroughfare and The Settlement and other historic communities in the County.

Work on the Scott Cemetery will include defining the limits of the cemetery, archaeologically fencing the cemetery, installing a sign and providing access. The Prince William County Historical Commission identified the Scott cemetery in its 2001 Countywide survey report and estimated the number of burials between 75 and 100 individuals. Hiring an archaeologist, at $100,000 annually, is also included in the funding allocation to support historic preservation and interpretation and to oversee the contracts involved as the work progresses. Opportunities to preserve African American history include architectural surveys of buildings and providing interpretive areas in The Settlement and Thoroughfare communities.

The cemetery was not listed in Circuit Court record deeds or noted in an independent property appraisal. Heirs to the property did not disclose the existence of the cemetery. The property sold at judicial auction for unpaid taxes in July 2020, according to Prince William County Circuit Court records.

“I have had the chance to meet with Frank and Delaney Washington in person after phone calls and emails. We were able to walk the Thoroughfare community. I wish to thank the County staff for continuing to prioritize this matter. Together, we will identify a path forward,” said Prince William Board of County Supervisors Chair-at-Large Ann Wheeler.

According to Sup. Margaret A. Franklin, “This is an unfortunate situation, but this Board is working together to help right this wrong so that this incident never happens again.”

Staff also recommended increasing education and notifications to potential owners of historic properties and cemeteries, establishing a grant program to help identify and properly mark historic properties and encouraging property owners to speak with private attorneys to file documentation with the Prince William County Circuit Court land records.


William Scott

When William “Bill” Scott was sworn in as San Francisco’s new police chief in January 2017, he vowed to build trust both within the department and outside it.

Scott had previously served for 27 years in the Los Angeles Police Department, where he was a deputy chief. He was selected to lead the SFPD after a nationwide search. Then-Mayor Edwin Lee said a major factor in his choice was Scott’s experience in helping lead the Los Angeles department through transformational progress.

Scott grew up in Birmingham, Alabama, and attended the University of Alabama, where he earned a degree in Accounting. He is married with three children.

“I am honored to work in the City and County of San Francisco, where residents, community leaders and local stakeholders are actively engaged in the process to help make our Police Department the finest in the nation,” said Chief Scott. “The members of SFPD are committed to safeguarding lives, preventing crime, enforcing our laws and providing safety with respect to everyone we serve.”


Watch the video: Why Hollywood Wont Cast Seann William Scott Anymore