Plymouth Rock LSD-29 - History

Plymouth Rock LSD-29 - History


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Plymouth Rock

(LSD-29: dp. 6,880; 1. 510'; b. 84'; dr. 19'; s. 21 k.; cpl. 766;
a. 16 3"; cl. Thomaston)

Plymouth Rock (LSD-29) was laid down by Ingalls Shipbuilding Corp., Paseagoula, Miss. 4 May 1953, launched 7 May 1954; Eponsored by Mrs. Franeis C. Denebrink; and commissioned 29 November 1954, Comdr. D. Bontecou in command.

After sailing in January 1955 to Norfolk, her homeport, Plymouth Rock conducted shakedown off the East Coast and in the Caribbean. In the summer of 1955 she transported men and equipment to early warning sites in the far north. In March 1956 she deployed to the Mediterranean for amphibious oDerations, returning in October. During 1957 she made

numerous trips to the Caribbean, and again resupplied the Aretie Distant Early Warning Line.

From May to October 1958 Plymouth Rock operated as a unit of the 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean participating in the landing of U.S. Marines in Lebanon in Juiy. After developing the eoneept of "vertical envelopment" by helicopter assault in early 1959, she made a Caribbean cruise to Puerto Rico and Cuba. In February 1960 she participated in operation "Amigo," carrying support helicopters and other equipment for President Eisenhower's ViEit to South America. From hIareh to December, she again deployed to the Mediterranean.

During 1961 Plyinouth Rock made several cruises to the Caribbean and one to the Mediterranean, including work on project "Mercury" and project ASROC. During 1962 she made several deployments to the Caribbean, and was a member of the blockade force during the Cuban Missile Crisis. On 7 May 1963 she again deployed to the Mediterranean, returning in October.

In 1964 Plymouth Rock made two Caribbean cruises and then took part in operation "Steel Pike I" off the coast of Spain, the largest amphibious operation since World War II. Early 1965 found Plymouth Rock on another Caribbean cruise. From 28 January 1966 to 7 March she was involved in H-Bomb recovery operations off Palomares, Spain. Late 1966 found her once again in the Caribbean, providing for the victims of hurricane "Inez" in Haiti. After three Caribbean cruises in early 1967, Plymouth Rock deployed to northern Europe. She made two more Caribbean deployments in 1968. From June to July 1969 she again deployed to northern Europe. She remains with the Atlantic Fleet into 1970.


Service history [ edit | edit source ]

After sailing in January 1955 to Norfolk, her homeport, Plymouth Rock conducted shakedown off the East Coast and in the Caribbean. In the summer of 1955 she transported men and equipment to early warning sites in the far north. In March 1956 she deployed to the Mediterranean for amphibious operations, returning in October. During 1957 she made numerous trips to the Caribbean, and again resupplied the Arctic Distant Early Warning Line.

From May to October 1958 Plymouth Rock operated as a unit of the 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean, participating in the landing of U.S. Marines in Lebanon in July. After developing the concept of "vertical envelopment" by helicopter assault in early 1959, she made a Caribbean cruise to Puerto Rico and Cuba. In February 1960 she participated in "Operation Amigo", carrying support helicopters and other equipment for President Dwight Eisenhower's visit to South America. From March to December, she again deployed to the Mediterranean.

During 1961 Plymouth Rock made several cruises to the Caribbean and one to the Mediterranean, including work on Project Mercury and Project ASROC. During 1962 she made several deployments to the Caribbean, and was a member of the blockade force during the Cuban Missile Crisis. On 7 May 1963 she again deployed to the Mediterranean, returning in October.

In 1964 Plymouth Rock made two Caribbean cruises and then took part in Operation Steel Pike I off the coast of Spain, the largest amphibious operation since World War II. Early 1965 found Plymouth Rock on another Caribbean cruise. From 28 January to 7 March 1966 she was involved in H-Bomb recovery operations off Palomares, Spain following the Palomares hydrogen bombs incident. Ώ] Late 1966 found her once again in the Caribbean, providing for the victims of Hurricane Inez in Haiti. After three Caribbean cruises in early 1967, Plymouth Rock deployed to northern Europe. She made two more Caribbean deployments in 1968. From June to July 1969 she again deployed to northern Europe.

Plymouth Rock was decommissioned on 30 September 1983 and transferred to the Maritime Administration on 8 November 1989 and laid up in the National Defense Reserve Fleet. Her name was struck from the Navy List on 24 February 1992 and she was sold for scrapping, 25 August 1995, to Peck Recycling, Richmond, Virginia, for $268,707.


PLYMOUTH ROCK LSD 29

This section lists the names and designations that the ship had during its lifetime. The list is in chronological order.

    Thomaston Class Dock Landing Ship
    Keel Laid May 4 1953 - Launched May 7 1954

Naval Covers

This section lists active links to the pages displaying covers associated with the ship. There should be a separate set of pages for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Covers should be presented in chronological order (or as best as can be determined).

Since a ship may have many covers, they may be split among many pages so it doesn't take forever for the pages to load. Each page link should be accompanied by a date range for covers on that page.

Postmarks

This section lists examples of the postmarks used by the ship. There should be a separate set of postmarks for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Within each set, the postmarks should be listed in order of their classification type. If more than one postmark has the same classification, then they should be further sorted by date of earliest known usage.

A postmark should not be included unless accompanied by a close-up image and/or an image of a cover showing that postmark. Date ranges MUST be based ONLY ON COVERS IN THE MUSEUM and are expected to change as more covers are added.
 
>>> If you have a better example for any of the postmarks, please feel free to replace the existing example.


Plymouth Rock LSD-29 - History

USS Plymouth Rock , a 11,270-ton Thomaston class dock landing ship, was built at Pascagoula, Mississippi. Commissioned in November 1954, she was assigned to the Atlantic Fleet. Over the next three decades, Plymouth Rock deployed regularly to the Caribbean area, made several cruises with the Sixth Fleet in the Mediterranean, and occasionally visited northern Europe and South America. She also participated in Arctic Distant Early Warning (DEW) Line support operations in 1955 and 1957, a Project "Mercury" space flight support mission in 1961, the Cuban Missile Crisis blockade in 1962, the Palomares nuclear weapons recovery effort in 1966, weapons development efforts, disaster relief undertakings, and a large number of Amphibious exercises. USS Plymouth Rock was decommissioned in September 1983. Following a decade in the Reserve Fleet, she was sold for scrapping in September 1995.

This page features all our images related to USS Plymouth Rock .

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

Photographed circa the later 1950s or early 1960s, with a HUS helicopter parked on her after deck.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 130KB 740 x 610 pixels

Photographed circa 1963, while she was fitted with a retractable sonar forward.
The photograph was received with the annual ship's historical submission, dated 6 January 1964.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 115KB 740 x 605 pixels

Underway on 8 April 1963, shortly before she deployed to the Mediterranean for a tour with the Sixth Fleet.
She has an experimental retractable sonar fitted to her bow.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph.

Online Image: 98KB 740 x 610 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system as Photo # 428-N-1089896.

Pulls alongside USS Iwo Jima (LPH-2) for refueling, during operations in the Atlantic, February 1979.
Photographed by PH2 Alexander and PH3 Kent from on board the Iwo Jima . CH-46 "Sea Knight" helicopters of Marine Medium Helicopter Squadron 261 (HMM-261) are parked in the foreground.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 99KB 475 x 765 pixels

Amphibious Group at sea, 17 April 1964

The ships are USS Hermitage (LSD-34) in left foreground, USS Francis Marion (APA-249) in center, USS Plymouth Rock (LSD-29) in the left rear and USS Yancey (APA-93) in the right rear.
Three UH-34 helicopters are flying in formation over the Francis Marion .

Photograph received from USS Francis Marion , 1964.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 92KB 740 x 610 pixels

Insignia of USS Plymouth Rock (LDS-29)

This emblem was received from the ship in 1958.
It features an alligator (symbol of the Amphibious Force) in Pilgrim dress, standing on the ship's namesake, Plymouth Rock, Massachusetts. A depiction of USS Plymouth Rock is in the left background.


Plymouth Rock LSD-29 - History

From Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships , Vol. V (1979), pp. 332

Site of the landing of the first permanent settlers in New England in 1620.

(LSD-29: dp. 6,880 l. 510' b. 84' dr. 19' s. 21 k. cpl. 766 a. 16 3" cl. Thomaston )

Plymouth Rock (LSD-29) was laid down by Ingalls Shipbuilding Corp., Pascagoula, Miss. 4 May 1953, launched 7 May 1954 Sponsored by Mrs. Francis C. Denebrink and commissioned 29 November 1954, Comdr. D. Bontecou in command.

After sailing in January 1955 to Norfolk, her homeport, Plymouth Rock conducted shakedown off the East Coast and in the Caribbean. In the summer of 1955 she transported men and equipment to early warning sites in the far north. In March 1956 she deployed to the Mediterranean for amphibious operations, returning in October. During 1957 she made numerous trips to the Caribbean, and again resupplied the Arctic Distant Early Warning Line.

>From May to October 1958 Plymouth Rock operated as a unit of the 6th Fleet in the Mediterranean participating in the landing of U.S. Marines in Lebanon in July. After developing the concept of "vertical envelopment" by helicopter assault in early 1959, she made a Caribbean cruise to Puerto Rico and Cuba. In February 1960 she participated in operation "Amigo," carrying support helicopters and other equipment for President Eisenhower's visit to South America. From March to December, she again deployed to the Mediterranean.

During 1961 Plymouth Rock made several cruises to the Caribbean and one to the Mediterranean, including work on project "Mercury" and project ASROC. During 1962 she made several deployments to the Caribbean, and was a member of the blockade force during the Cuban Missile Crisis. On 7 May 1963 she again deployed to the Mediterranean, returning in October.

In 1964 Plymouth Rock made two Caribbean cruises and then took part in operation "Steel Pike I" off the coast of Spain, the largest amphibious operation since World War II. Early 1965 found Plymouth Rock on another Caribbean cruise. From 28 January 1966 to 7 March she was involved in H-Bomb recovery operations off Palomares, Spain. Late 1966 found her once again in the Caribbean, providing for the victims of hurricane "Inez" in Haiti. After three Caribbean cruises in early 1967, Plymouth Rock deployed to northern Europe. She made two more Caribbean deployments in 1968. From June to July 1969 she again deployed to northern Europe. She remains with the Atlantic Fleet into 1970.

[NOTE: Plymouth Rock was decommissioned 30 September 1983 and transferred to the Maritime Administration 8 Nov. 1989. Her name was struck from the Navy List on 24 February 1992 and she was sold 25 August 1995.]


Plymouth Rock History and Background

We first saw the Plymouth Rock in Massachusetts in 1849. No one is quite sure what happened to these original birds, as they seem to have disappeared for around 20 years or so.

The trail gets hot again in around 1869 when a Mr. Upham of Worcester, Massachusetts, was breeding with barred males and Java hens.

It’s claimed he was trying to breed selectively for barred plumage and clean legs.

It’s now thought that these birds are the likely ancestors of todays’ Plymouth Rock.

From our Dominique breed article, you may remember some confusion between the rose comb and single comb birds, with both being called Dominiques at the time.

The New York Poultry Society was determined to set the standard for the Dominique as rose combed. After 1870, all other birds with single combs became Plymouth Rocks by default.

The appearance of Plymouth Rock Chickens

If you asked most folks what a Plymouth Rock hen’s plumage looked like, they would say “black and white bars,” which would be correct as far as it goes.

The barring between the sexes is slightly different. The males have equal black and white barring, with each feather ending in a dark tip.

Whereas females have black bars that are slightly wider than the white bars, this can sometimes give them a slightly darker greyish hue than the boys.

There are several other varieties in the Plymouth Rock family, as we shall see.


The Barred Plymouth Rock is the oldest and best known of the Plymouth Rock family.

In fact, it is probably iconic in American culture, so in this article, we will describe the barred Plymouth Rock member of the family.

It has a large, sturdy triangular-shaped body with a full breast and a long, broad back.

Feathers are full, loose, and very soft, especially on the abdomen area.

The barring pattern should be sharply defined black and white, unlike the Dominique, which is much ‘fuzzier’ and leans towards grey.

Skin and legs are yellow, and their legs are clean, with four toes to each foot. Their ear lobes, comb, and wattles should all be read as is the face.

The beak is horn colored, and the eyes a reddish bay. Finally, their comb should be single with 5 points.

A standard-sized hen will weigh about 7½lbs, with roosters up to 9½lbs.

There is a bantam variety, and their weights are 2.5lbs for females and 3.0lbs for males.

Plymouth Rock Breed Standard

The Barred Plymouth Rock breed was admitted to the American Poultry Association in 1874. Currently, there are seven accepted varieties. The varieties of the Plymouth Rock recognized in the US are:

  • Barred
  • Blue
  • Buff
  • Colombian
  • Partridge
  • Silver Penciled
  • White

All are rare except the barred and the white.

The Poultry Club of Great Britain recognizes only 5 varieties (Barred, Black, Buff, Colombian and White), while the European Association of Poultry recognizes 10 varieties.

The APA classifies the breed as American, while the PCGB classifies it as a soft feather and heavy.

Egg Laying and Temperament

Plymouth Rocks are very respectable layers of large brown eggs. They average around 200 eggs per year which equates to roughly 4 eggs per week.

They lay well for the first couple of years but around year 3, a slow decline in productivity starts. However, hens have been known to lay into their 10 th year!

In terms of broodiness, they aren’t known for it, but it can actively be encouraged in this breed, with the hens usually being good sitters and great moms.

The chicks are quick to feather out and mature, and by 8-12 weeks of age, they can be considered broilers if desired.

In terms of their temperament, Barred Rocks are mellow birds. They are not known for bad attitudes or picking at flock mates, and they seem to get along with everyone.

They are described by their owners as sweet, calm, and docile – even the roosters!

Plymouth Rocks are always curious, and they love to check out their environment and follow you around to see what you are up to or any treats to be had.

Rocks much prefer to free-range and find tasty morsels in the yard, but they tolerate confinement well if given enough space.

Once you have established your relationship, this is a very trusting hen and is great with the family and children.

Health Issues

Plymouth Rocks are a healthy, sturdy breed. They aren’t bothered by any particular ailments except the usual array of parasites.

The roosters do have large combs and wattles, so that they may need some attention to those areas in bitterly cold weather.

They have a good genetic pool, so they are usually healthy, long-lived birds that can live for 10-12 years if cared for.

Exceptional birds have lived up to 20 years!

Is The Plymouth Rock Chicken Right For You?

If you are looking for a breed that is suitable for a family setting, this could be your bird. Barred Rocks are known for being friendly towards children and adults. They do enjoy a cuddle and a fuss, and many become lap chickens!

They are poor flyers, so you don’t need to have a huge fence around their enclosure to keep them in, as they are unlikely to go and investigate the neighbors’ yard unless they can walk there.

Speaking of neighbors – the Barred Rock is said to be a quiet but talkative chicken.

Of course, it does have the usual chicken vocabulary, including the egg song, but the Barred Rock tends to ‘whisper’ rather than ‘shout’ across the yard. That should keep the neighbors happier.

They are very easy-going, not difficult to care for, making them a good choice for first-time chicken folks. Plymouth

Rocks are very tolerant of poor management practices, although ideally, they won’t need to be. If treated and cared for well, they can virtually raise themselves!

Their mellow temperament also makes them a good choice for 4H projects and the exhibition arena, where they usually do very well.

Summary

The Barred Rock has a long and distinguished history, even though the origins are a bit murky.
After the 2 nd World War, the Barred Rock declined in popularity. The breed made the American Livestock Breed Conservancy list. The ALBC still has it is currently listed as recovering.
The recovery is likely due to a renewed interest in backyard chickens, especially dual-purpose breeds that can fit well into almost any circumstance.
Todays’ Barred Rock hens can be divided into three separate groups:

  • Exhibition: These birds are all about conformation and plumage. Often productivity will suffer.
  • Industrial Production: High volume producers bred for the poultry industry, not suitable for 4H purposes.
  • Old Dual Purpose: These are the hens that Grandma had. Dependable for eggs and meat. Long-lived and amiable, requiring minimal care.

They fit well into just about any scenario you can think of.
As backyard birds, they do great they tolerate confinement or free-ranging, do not require any special treatments, and are chatty and friendly. Egg production is very respectable, and as meat birds, they dress out nicely to a good weight. What more could you ask of your chickens?
If you keep Barred Rocks – tell us about them in the comments section below, please…


USS Plymouth Rock (LSD 29)

Named after the site of the landing of the first permanent settlers in New England in 1620, the USS PLYMOUTH ROCK was the second THOMASTON - class dock landing ship and the first ship in the Navy to bear the name. Decommissioned on September 30, 1983, the PLYMOUTH ROCK was stricken from the Navy list on February 24, 1992, after being transfered to the Maritime Administration (MARAD) in November 1989. The ship was finally sold for scrapping to Peck Recycling, Richmond, Va., on August 25, 1995.

General Characteristics: Awarded: February 28, 1952
Keel laid: May 4, 1953
Launched: May 7, 1954
Commissioned: November 29, 1954
Decommissioned: September 30, 1983
Builder: Ingalls Shipbuilding, Pascagoula, Miss.
Propulsion system: two 600 psi boilers, twp geared turbines
Propellers: two
Length: 510 feet (155.5 meters)
Beam: 84 feet (25.6 meters)
Draft: 19 feet (5.8 meters)
Displacement: approx. 11,300 tons full load
Speed: 22 knots
Well deck capacity: three LCU or nine LCM-8 or 50 AAV
Aircraft: helo platform only
Crew: Ship: 18 officers, 330 enlisted
Crew: Marine Detachment: approx. 330 Marines
Armament: two dual 3-inch/50-caliber Mk-33 gun mounts

This section contains the names of sailors who served aboard USS PLYMOUTH ROCK. It is no official listing but contains the names of sailors who submitted their information.


The True Story Behind Plymouth Rock

Plymouth Rock, located on the shore of Plymouth Harbor in Massachusetts, is reputed to be the very spot where William Bradford, an early governor of Plymouth colony, and other Pilgrims first set foot on land  in 1620. Yet, there is no mention of the granite stone in the two surviving firsthand accounts of the founding of the colony—Bradford’s famous manuscript Of Plymouth Plantation and Edward Winslow’s writings published in a document called “Mourt’s Relation.”

In fact, the rock went unidentified for 121 years. It wasn’t until 1741, when a wharf was to be built over it, that 94-year-old Thomas Faunce, a town record keeper and the son of a pilgrim who arrived in Plymouth in 1623, reported the rock’s significance. Ever since, Plymouth Rock has been an object of reverence, as a symbol of the founding of a new nation.

“It is important because of what people have turned it into,” says Larry Bird, a curator in the National Museum of American History’s division of political history. “To possess a piece of it is to look at a historical moment in terms of image making and imagery. We choose these moments, and these things become invested with values that continue to speak to us today.”

In 1774, Plymouth Rock was split, horizontally, into two pieces. “Like a bagel,” writes John McPhee in “Travels of the Rock,” a story that appeared in the New Yorker in 1990. (Bird considers McPhee’s story one of the best pieces written about the rock.) “There were those who feared and those who hoped that the break in the rock portended an irreversible rupture between England and the American colonies,” writes McPhee. Actually, the upper half was transported to the town square where it was used to rile up New Englanders to want to gain independence from the Mother Country. Meanwhile, over the course of the next century, people, wanting a stake in the history, slowly chipped away at the half of the rock still on shore.

The National Museum of American History has two pieces of Plymouth Rock in its collection. “The one that I like is painted with a little affidavit by Lewis Bradford, who is a descendent of William Bradford,” says Bird. “He paints on it the exact moment of time in which he chips it from the ‘Mother Rock.’” The label on the small, four-inch by two-inch rock reads, “Broken from the Mother Rock by Mr. Lewis Bradford on Tues. 28th of Dec. 1850 4 1/2 o’clock p.m.” The artifact was donated to the museum in 1911 by the family of Gustavus Vasa Fox, a former Assistant Secretary of the Navy.

Much larger, weighing in at 100 pounds, the second hunk of rock was once part of a 400-pound portion owned by the Plymouth Antiquarian Society. The organization came into possession of the rock in the 1920s it bought the Sandwich Street Harlow House, where the stone was being used as a doorstep. The society ended up breaking the 400-pound rock into three pieces, and the museum acquired one in 1985.

“Like a Lincoln fence rail piece, a tiny piece of Mount Vernon or even a piece of the Bastille, Plymouth Rock is part of who we are as a people,” says Bird.


History

In 1774, Plymouth townspeople decided to relocate their landmark, engaging 30 yoke of oxen for the job. The screws they installed to help move it served as wedges splitting the rock in half as soon as the oxen pulled. In an 1834 Independence Day parade, a Mayflower replica accompanied by a two-wheeled cart transporting the upper half of the rock from the town common to Pilgrim Hall. When a pen reportedly dislodged, causing the card to tilt the rock hit the ground and broke into pieces. The lower half remained at the waterfront, vulnerable to the elements and part of a commercial wharf, across which iron-wheeled carts of fish, coal, and other goods rolled. A local merchant kept a hammer and chisel on hand for souvenir seekers. In 1880 the halves were reunited, though by then the pieces no longer matched. Town officials chinked in the spaces with random (less historic) stones and chiseled in the date �.” Places where pieces of Plymouth Rock have come to rest: the Plymouth Congregational Church in Brooklyn New York the Conoco refinery in Hull, Massachusetts the Smithsonian and museums in California and Nevada. In the 1920s, the Antiquarian Society of Plymouth sold pieces as paperweights. Other known uses: tie tacks, cufflinks, pendants, earrings, a 400-pound doorstop, and a weight for a barrel of corn beef.

-Adapted from, “A Piece of the Rock” by Jeff Baker November 2000 Yankee Magazine


Plymouth Rock

The political history collection at the Smithsonian&rsquos National Museum of American History contains two pieces of Plymouth Rock, where&mdashaccording to legend&mdashthe Pilgrims landed in 1620. The first piece of Plymouth Rock in the collection is 4&rdquox2&rdquo and was chipped from the rock in 1830 by a descendant of Governor William Bradford of Plymouth Colony. Lewis Bradford marked the piece with a label that reads, &ldquoBroken from the Mother Rock by Mr. Lewis Bradford on Tues. 28th of Dec. 1850 4 ½ o&rsquoclock p.m.&rdquo This piece of rock found its way into the hands of Gustavus Vasa Fox, a New England antiquarian, diplomat, and Assistant Secretary of the Navy. It was donated to the Smithsonian by the Fox family in 1911.

The second piece of Plymouth Rock weighs in at 100 pounds. In the 1920s, the Plymouth Antiquarian Society inherited a 400-pound piece of the &ldquoMother rock&rdquo when it purchased the Sandwich Street Harlow House and discovered the rock being used as a doorstep. The society broke the doorstep in three pieces and, in 1984, offered a piece to the Smithsonian. In 1985, museum officials traveled to Plymouth, Mass., to accept the gift.

History of Plymouth Rock

The Mayflower arrived in Plymouth Harbor in 1620, after first stopping near today's Provincetown. According to oral tradition, Plymouth Rock was the site where William Bradford and other Pilgrims first set foot on land. Bradford was the governor of Plymouth Colony for 30 years and is credited with establishing what we now call Thanksgiving.

The story of the Pilgrims coming ashore at Plymouth Rock is not mentioned in contemporary accounts of the landing, but was first described in 1771. In 1774, a team attempted to move the rock from shore and place it next to Plymouth&rsquos liberty pole in the town square. Before it could be removed from the beach, it accidentally broke in two. &ldquoThe Mother Rock&rdquo remained in place and the other piece of rock was moved into town. In 1880 the two pieces were reunited back on the shore and cemented together&mdashbut not before a number of pieces had been broken off for souvenirs or other purposes.

Over the years, Plymouth Rock has achieved the status of national icon and crept into America&rsquos historical consciousness through the imaginative creation of authors, painters, and political officials.

The chipped piece taken from the &ldquoMother Rock&rdquo by Bradford&rsquos descendent will be featured in a forthcoming book about museum relics entitled, The Triumphal Souvenir, by curator William Lawrence Bird.


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